Translation from English

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

State Senator Liz Krueger


 
Inline image 1


State Senator Liz Krueger
Standing Up And Speaking Out
New York State Senate – 28th District
Community Bulletin – October 2016
 
Table of Contents
Message from Liz
Policy Spotlight
        Maternal Depression Screening
Community Update
        Annual Free Flu Shot Drive on October 14
        Connie Cook: A Documentary on October 17
        Senator Liz Krueger’s Tenth Annual Senior Resource Fair on October 27th
        In or Out: A Roundtable on Fossil Fuel Divestment on October 28th
        Fall Prevention Health Fair
        Forum on Retirement Issues and New York’s Vanishing Middle Class
        Beth Israel Transformation Public Forum
        Testimony Regarding East Midtown Rezoning
        Upcoming Pet Adoption Events 
        Financial Empowerment Workshops at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House        
        Legal Advocacy Clinics From Lenox Hill Neighborhood House 
        Monthly Housing Clinics and Workshops
        Affordable Housing Opportunities in Manhattan 
        Metrocard Bus and Van Schedule
        Heat Season Rules
 
Message from Liz...
Once again Albany corruption is in the news, with US Prosecutor Preet Bharara and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman both bringing charges against Cuomo administration officials for accepting bribes and bid rigging on state contracts.  The charges against top Cuomo aide Joe Percoco,  SUNY Polytechnic Institute President Alain Kayoleros, and others just confirm New York’s reputation as perhaps the most corrupt state government in the country.  I find this depressing, and it makes me angry to have to be affiliated with either elected officials or staffers who can’t follow our laws.  All of these cases taint the reputations of everyone working in state government, including mine.
 
Much of this newest scandal revolves around special deals for contractors on state economic development projects.  Lack of accountability for economic development spending has been a chronic problem in New York State, The SUNY Institute was particularly ripe for abuse thanks to a 2011 budget provision that stripped the State Comptroller of oversight over contracts for a variety of SUNY and CUNY related entities.  
 
The Cuomo administration’s response to the corruption at the SUNY Institute is to transfer oversight of it to the Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC).  While there may be Â greater oversight of ESDC contracting, it is also caught up in the investigation, with the allegation that Percoco took a bribe to get ESDC to approve a contract for a company technically not qualified for the project.  And I have previously written about other concerns with the ESDC programs and their lack of transparency.
 
Unfortunately corrupt individuals will always try to find ways to profit through corrupt activities, but we in state government do have the ability to make it much harder for them to succeed.  Multiple checks and balances on contract approval is one way to do this, and I believe a key part of the solution is restoring Comptroller oversight where it has been weakened over the years, and strengthening oversight of public authority spending more generally.  I have been in discussions with the Comptroller’s office about how best to accomplish this goal, and I know many of my reform-minded colleagues are also looking at how to improve checks and balances.  When state agencies issue contracts, the Comptroller already plays this role, and it is critical that oversight of all public authorities is also strengthened.
 
I have long been concerned about the lack of accountability in state economic development expenditures, but have been more focused on whether the state is getting its money’s worth in terms of job creation for the resources we have devoted to these programs.  I carry legislation that would increase transparency regarding these expenditures and job creation outcomes.  The latest corruption scandal serves to reveal a deeper issue with lack of transparency, and shows how far the state has to go in providing the honest government New Yorkers deserve.  
 
Noticeably absent from this investigation was the state’s Joint Commission on Public Ethics (JCOPE), which still seems to be completely hamstrung as an investigatory body.  I believe that its structure of gubernatorial and legislative appointees has made it difficult for it to function effectively in investigating either of these branches of government. I commend Preet Bharara and Eric Schneiderman for stepping into this vacuum with their investigations – and unfortunately as Preet is fond of saying: “stay tuned,” as I fear there will be more revelations to come.
 
PS: I wanted to share an op-ed from my friend and constituent Leo Hindery of Patriotic Millionaires on the need to eliminate the Carried Interest Loophole: http://www.newsweek.com/ending-tax-loophole-fraud-one-state-time-501735?rx=us.  Particularly when some of our aspiring leaders are touting the virtues of tax avoidance, it’s nice to hear someone call for doing their fair share!
 
 
Policy Spotlight

Maternal Depression Screenings

I was extremely pleased that last month the New York State Department of Health revised its regulations to simplify Â the way pediatricians can bill for maternal depression screenings.  In 2014, New York passed legislation I carried to promote maternal depression screening by pediatricians, because they are the health care providers most likely to see the mother in the period after the birth.
 
Unfortunately, some insurers were not considering the screening to be a service for the insured child, despite the obvious impacts of maternal depression on infant health.  Pediatricians had been required to begin a new medical record as if the mother were the patient. If the pediatrician was not a participating provider in the mother's health plan (as distinct from the child's health plan), the screening might not be covered.
 
After  the Department of Health and the Department of Financial Services were notified of this issue, they initially suggested legislation was necessary to address the problem.  In response, Assemblymember Richard Gottfried, Assemblymember Diana Richardson, and I introduced A10066/S7881 to clarify that in those cases, the "patient" is the child; no new patient record needs to be created for the mother as patient; and the pediatric provider is covered if he or she is in the child's health plan network, regardless of whether he or she is in the mother's health plan network.  The bill passed the Assembly in 2016, but did not move in the Senate.
 
I am therefore gratified that the Health Department’s new guidance has created Medicaid billing codes that will allow pediatricians to bill for services on behalf of the child. This has been a particular problem for Medicaid patients, where the health insurance for the child and mother is sometimes different. It is likely that private insurers will also address this issue in any similar situations now that the state has set these guidelines.
 
I am also grateful to the relentless efforts of health care providers and advocates across the state to address this critical issue, including the NYS American Academy of Pediatrics, Postpartum Resource Center of NY, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the March of Dimes. And a shout-out to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s commitment to implementing screening of new mothers at all NYC hospitals as part of ThriveNYC.
 
If you or a loved one is suffering from maternal depression, help is available. Call the Postpartum Resource Center of NY's helpline: 855-631-0001.


Community Spotlight

Annual Free Flu Shot Drive on October 14:
I am pleased to once again offer free flu vaccines, in partnership with the New York-Presbyterian Ambulatory Care Network and River Spring Health, Assemblywoman Rebecca Seawright, and Council Member Dan Garodnick. There are still a few appointments available between 10:45am and 12:30pm on Friday, October 14th at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House’s Senior Center at St. Peter’s Church, 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street. To make an appointment, you may contact my office at 212-490-9535 or spasquan@nysenate.gov.
 
Connie Cook: A Documentary on October 17:
Remember the quote “those who forget history are doomed to repeat it”?  Well, I feel like that when it comes to the fight to protect women’s reproductive health.  So I am pleased to host a free screening of Connie Cook: A Documentary, a film about a progressive Republican Assemblywoman from Upstate NY who wrote the legislation that decriminalized abortion in New York State in 1970.  Connie's efforts were used as a foundation for Roe v. Wade three years later.
 
Connie was one of only a few female corporate lawyers in NYC in the 1940’s and an important pioneer in the fight for women’s rights. She was an Assembly Member when there were only two other women members in the 1960’s and early 1970’s. Her efforts regarding abortion became the critical model for the rest of the country. In 1974, she sued the Episcopal Church so that women could be priests -- and she won.
 
After the screening, I will host a discussion with the film’s director, Sue Perlgut, and guests from prominent women’s rights groups about what Connie’s message means for us today.
 
The screening will take place on Monday, October 17th, from 6pm to 8pm at Marymount Manhattan College, Regina Peruggi Room, 2nd Floor, at 221 East 71st Street. Space is limited, so please RSVP by contacting my office at 212-490-9535, or via email at spasquan@nysenate.gov.

Senator Liz Krueger’s Tenth Annual Senior Resource Fair on October 27th:
My tenth annual Senior Resource Fair will take place Thursday, October 27th from 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. at Temple Emanu-El, One East 65th Street (at Fifth Avenue).  Over 500 people attended last year’s event.  This year we will have over 50 exhibitors from non-profits and city and state agencies with information for Older Adults. Admission is free.  Light refreshments will be served. NO RSVP NECESSARY. For further information, call (212) 490-9535.
 
In or Out: A Roundtable on Fossil Fuel Divestment on October 28th:
I will host a moderated discussion on the financial and fiduciary implications of divesting New York State's pension fund from fossil fuels.

The New York State Common Retirement Fund, the pension fund for over one million New Yorkers, has around $4 billion invested in the world's top 200 fossil fuel producers. More than $1 billion of that is invested in a single company - ExxonMobil. However, in the face of rapidly accelerating climate change and increasingly strong action by local and national governments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, questions have been raised about the future profitability of fossil fuel companies. Concerns about "stranded assets" and lack of transparency, along with a global divestment movement led by environmental organizations like 350.org, has resulted in nearly six hundred organizations divesting from fossil fuels. These organizations include universities, faith-based organizations, non-profits, municipalities, philanthropic organizations, and national and state pension funds, controlling over $3.4 trillion in assets.

The roundtable is free and open to the public, and will include representatives from the office of New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, as well as a panel of financial and investment experts. It will take place on Friday, October 28th, from 10am to 12pm, at Baruch College, Rackow Room #750, 151 E 25th St., in Manhattan.
 
RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/zexphmr. Alternatively, email flagg@nysenate.gov or call 212-490-9535. 
 
Fall Prevention Health Fair:
On Friday, October 14th, New York Presbyterian Hospital’s HealthOutreach Program is hosting a Fall Prevention Health Fair.  The fair will offer a one-stop shop of falls-related information. Health care providers from the hospital (Audiology, Nursing, Pharmacy, Nutrition, Social Work, OT/PT) as well as representatives from community healthcare providers will provide information and answer your questions.  The event will take place from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Starr Building, 520 East 70th Street (b/t York and the river) in the Cayuga Room.  No reservations necessary – just stop by.
 
Forum on Retirement Issues and New York’s Vanishing Middle Class:
On Thursday, October 20th, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, AARP New York Â is hosting a forum entitled: “Countdown: New York’s Vanishing Middle Class – Is Retirement Just an Illusion for Gen Xers and Baby Boomers?” The forum will address whether today’s workers can maintain their middle class lifestyle as they age, and offer an opportunity to share experiences and get empowered to prepare for what’s next.
 
At the forum, AARP New York and the Siena College Research Institute will release the results of a new survey on these issues, and there will be a discussion with Jane Bryant Quinn, author of “Making the Most of your Money Now”, Don Levy, Polling Director, Sienna College, Beth Finkel, State Director, AARP NY, and Kate Bridges, Senior Research Advisor, AARP.  The event will take place at The Benjamin Hotel, 125 East 50th Street at Lexington Avenue.  Please RSVP to https://aarp.cvent.com/NewYorkCityCountdown or call 877-926-8300.

Beth Israel Transformation Public Forum:
On Thursday, October 27th from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Mount Sinai is hosting a public forum to provide information on their plans for Beth Israel Hospital.  Beth Israel is now part of Mt. Sinai, and over the next few years, they plan to significantly reduce inpatient beds and build a new emergency room facility as part of a broader “transformation” of their healthcare services in lower Manhattan.  I have joined other elected officials in raising potential issues and questions regarding this transformation, and look forward to attending the forum in order to learn more about their plans.  It is critical that changes to Beth Israel do not undermine the provision of quality healthcare for the surrounding communities.
 
The forum will take place at Podel Auditorium in the Bernstein Pavilion, 10 Nathan D. Perlman Place, which is located between 1st and 2nd Avenues near East 16th Street.

Testimony Regarding East Midtown Rezoning:
Earlier this month I joined my colleague Senator Brad Hoylman in submitting testimony on the draft scope of work for the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the city’s proposed East Midtown Rezoning. We appreciate that the process for evaluation of this plan is being undertaken with substantially greater opportunity for public comment than the original plan proposed by the Bloomberg administration in 2012.  While we strongly support the goals of the plan for modernizing building stock and infrastructure in the East Midtown area, we have a number of questions and concerns.

Among our concerns:
- The need to ensure adequate investment in transportation infrastructure improvements;
- The importance of dedicating proceeds of air rights sales by landmarked properties to efforts to preserve those properties;
- Questions about how much office space capacity is needed in the area, and the potential impacts of the rezoning on the diversity of street level retail establishments;
- The need to ensure adequate open space, light, and air, and to minimize negative environmental impacts of new construction. 
 

Upcoming Pet Adoption Events:
Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) is sponsoring several Pet Adoption events around the district in December. Upcoming dates and locations are:

Saturday, October 8, 11AM-3PM: 
Biscuits & Bath Sutton Place, 1064 1st Avenue at East 58th Street – Dogs only 
 
Saturday, October 15, 12-4PM: 
Upper East Side Craft Fair, East 82nd Street between Park and Madison Avenues
 
Saturday, October 22, 12-4PM: 
Rabbit Adoptions hosted by NYPD's 19th Precinct, Petco at 1280 Lexington Ave **rabbits only**
 
Sunday, October 23, 12-4PM: 
Adoptions hosted by the Central Park NYPD, In front of the Children's Zoo
 
Upcoming events are also listed at http://nycacc.org/Events.htm
 
Financial Empowerment Workshops at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House:
Every Tuesday from October 4th through November 1st, Lenox Hill Neighborhood House is offering “Getting Ahead” a free in-depth Financial Literacy Course, which will meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th Street.  The course will provide an opportunity to see your credit report, meet one-on-one with a financial advisor, open a free savings account, and set and reach financial goals.  Registration is required.  To enroll, contact Lauren Bernstein at 212-218-0413 or lbernstein@lenoxhill.org no later than September 23rd.
 
Legal Advocacy Clinics At Lenox Hill Neighborhood House:
The Lenox Hill Neighborhood House Legal Advocacy Center Offers assistance on a number of different issues. Here is a list of their ongoing programs and clinics:
● SNAP (formerly Food Stamps) Clinics: Wednesdays from 10am to 1pm at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th Street. First come, first served. Bring proof of identity, income information, utility bill, proof of housing costs, information on any dependents and if you are 60 or over or on SSI/SSD, information on medical costs.  For more information, call 
212-218-0431.
● SCRIE Clinics: call 
212-218-0503 ext. 6 for assistance in applying or recertifying for the Senior Citizens Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) program. The SCRIE clinic is open to tenants city-wide. Please note that due to the volume of calls, it sometimes takes up to two weeks for staff to respond to messages.
● Eviction Prevention: Walk-in clinic, every 2nd and 4th  Monday of the month, from 
10am to 1pm at 331 East 70th Street, for tenants who live, work, or go to school on Manhattan’s East Side above 59th Street and on Roosevelt Island.
● End-of-Life Planning/Advance Directives: volunteer attorneys may be able to assist you with one-on-one counseling and individualized drafting of Advance Directives including Health Care Proxies, Living Wills, Powers of Attorney, and simple, low-asset Wills. If you are interested in being screened for a possible appointment,  call the intake hotline at 
212-218-0503 ext 4.
● Health Care Access/Medicare/Medicaid: call 
212-218-0503 ext 3. Find out about Medicare Savings Programs, Medicaid home care, Medicare Part D, Medicaid Spend-down, EPIC and if you are eligible for Medicaid.
● Health Insurance Enrollment: call 
212-218-0432.  Assistance with finding and enrolling in an affordable health insurance plan. 
 
And, just across the Park on the Westside: Monthly Housing Clinics and Workshops:
Council Member Helen Rosenthal, Goddard Riverside’s SRO Law Project, and the Urban Justice Center co-sponsor monthly housing clinics and workshops at the Goddard Riverside Community Center, 593 Columbus Avenue (between 88th and 89th Streets). On the first Wednesday of each month, from 6pm – 8pm, the clinic offers a presentation on a variety of topics, followed by a question and answer session. Each evening, at least one staff attorney will meet with individuals who are seeking specific legal advice. 
 
For questions, contact the Office of Council Member Rosenthal at (212) 873-0282 ext. 206 or Helen@helenrosenthal.com. Sign-up sheet starting at 6pm each evening.
 
November 2, 2016: HPs, Repairs, Heat/Hot Water, Bedbugs, Clutter
December 7, 2016: Housing Court 101
January 4, 2017: Types of Affordable Housing including Vouchers, Roommates, Subletting
February 1, 2017: “Bad Actor” activity including Harassment, Illegal Hotels & Buyouts
March 1, 2017: Residency Requirements for Rent Regulated Apartments
April 5, 2017: DHCR Overview, including MCIs and IAIs
May 3, 2017: DHCR Rent Overcharges and Illegal Deregulation
June 7, 2017: Succession Rights
 
Affordable Housing Opportunities in Manhattan:
American Copper Buildings
 is now accepting applications for 160 affordable studio and 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 225 East 39th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $833 and $1,247, depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $29,898 and $63,060, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 6 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
 
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to American Copper Buildings c/o Breaking Ground, PO Box 3620937, New York, NY 10129.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 14, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
Maestro West Chelsea Apartments is now accepting applications for 75 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 507 West 28th Street in the Chelsea neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $596 and $979, depending on income and unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $21,772 and $45,300, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 4 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
                                                            
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to Maestro West Chelsea, 87-14 116th Street, Richmond Hill, NY  11418.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 18, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
10 Freedom Place is now accepting applications for 110 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 10 Freedom Place south on the Upper West Side in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $833 and $1,458, depending on income and unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $29,898 and $72,480, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 7 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
                                                            
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to 10 Freedom Place 
c/o Breaking Ground, PO Box 3620937, New York, NY 10129.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by November 1, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
435 West 31 Apartments is now accepting applications for 169 affordable studio and 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 225 East 39th Street in the Hudson Yards neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $913 and $1,359, depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $32,640 and $63,060, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 4 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
 
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to 435 West 31 Apartments, c/o Breaking Ground, PO Box 3620937, New York, NY 10129.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 14, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.

Metrocard Bus and Van Schedule:
The MTA offers MetroCard-related services throughout New York City through mobile buses and vans. Buses provide a full range of services, including applying for or refilling a Reduced-Fare MetroCard, buying or refilling a regular MetroCard, or getting answers to a MetroCard-related question. Vans sell Unlimited Ride MetroCards and Pay-Per-Ride MetroCards, and they refill MetroCards and Reduced-Fare MetroCards. Buses and vans will be in my district on the following dates and locations:

October 11, 9 - 10:30 am, 92 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
October 11, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm., 86 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
October 11, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
October 19, 
9 - 10:30 am, 79 Street & 3 Avenue – Bus
October 19, 11 am - 1 pm, 7
9 Street & York Avenue – Bus
October 19, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 72 Street & York Avenue – Bus
October 20, 8:30 - 10:30 am, 47 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
October 20, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, 28 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
October 25, 9 - 10:30 am, 92 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
October 25, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm., 86 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
October 25, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
November 2, 9 - 10:30 am, 7
9 Street & 3 Avenue – Bus
November 2, 11 am - 1 pm, 7
9 Street & York Avenue – Bus
November 2, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 72 Street & York Avenue – Bus 
November 3, 7 – 9 am, 90 Street and York Avenue - Van
November 3, 8:30 - 10:30 am, 47 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
November 3, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, 28 Street & 2 Avenue – Van 
November 4, 9 - 10 am, 57 Street and 1 Avenue – Van
November 4, 10:30 - 11:30 am, 57 Street and 3 Avenue – Van
November 4, 12:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street and 1 Avenue – Van

The full mobile MetroCard schedule is available at http://mta.info/metrocard/mms.htm. Please note that MetroCard buses and vans do not take credit cards.
 
Heat Season Rules: 
The City Housing Maintenance Code and State Multiple Dwelling Law require building owners to provide heat and hot water to all tenants. Building owners are required to provide hot water 365 days a year at a constant minimum temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit. 
 
Between October 1st and May 31st, a period designated as “Heat Season,” building owners are also required to provide tenants with heat under the following conditions:
•           Between the hours of 6AM and 10PM, if the outside temperature falls below 55 degrees, the inside temperature is required to be at least 68 degrees Fahrenheit. 
•           Between the hours of 10PM and 6AM, if the temperature outside falls below 40 degrees, the inside temperature is required to be at least 55 degrees Fahrenheit. 
Tenants who are cold in their apartments should first attempt to notify the building owner, managing agent or superintendent. If heat is not restored, the tenant should call the City’s Citizen Service Center at 311. For the hearing-impaired, the TTY number is (212) 504-4115. The Center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Complaints can also be submitted online at http://www1.nyc.gov/nyc-resources/service/1813/heat-or-hot-water-complaint.