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Thursday, September 8, 2016

State Senator Liz Krueger


 
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State Senator Liz Krueger
Standing Up And Speaking Out
New York State Senate – 28th District
Community Bulletin – September 2016
 
Table of Contents
Message from Liz
Policy Spotlight
        Fracking Waste
Community Update
        Senator Liz Krueger’s Tenth Annual Senior Resource Fair on October 27th
        Primary Election Tuesday September 13
        Student Registration Centers Open through September 16th
        Upcoming Pet Adoption Events 
        The Radical Age Movement Forum on Technology and Ageism
        Shred-a-Thon on September 24th
        Department of Sanitation SAFE Disposal Event 
        Your Rights to Accessible Housing
        Scam Alert – Fake Calls from State Tax Department        
        Financial Empowerment Workshops at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House        
        Legal Advocacy Clinics From Lenox Hill Neighborhood House 
        VOLS Legal Clinics for Low-Income Residents Over Age 60
        Affordable Housing Opportunities in Manhattan 
        Metrocard Bus and Van Schedule
 
Message from Liz...
While I usually use my message to talk about some big-picture Albany issue, I thought that this month I would pick something more local and, I would venture to say based on what I hear from constituents, much more controversial.
 
Since I was first elected to the State Senate, my office has received a litany of complaints regarding the uptick of cyclists on our streets. My staff and I regularly hear from frustrated residents who are fed up with the behavior of some bicyclists that puts pedestrians at risk: riding the wrong way on a street or in bike lanes, riding on the sidewalk, failing to yield, and simply not obeying the law -- either because they don’t know it, or they don’t care. Most cyclists do use their bicycles safely and obey appropriate traffic laws, but as they say, it only takes a few rotten apples…
 
Cyclists who do not obey traffic laws do harm to the reputation of all bikers and put pedestrians at risk of serious injury or even death.  But it is important to place these dangers in context -- cars and trucks cause far more injuries and fatalities.  For instance, in New York City in 2014, vehicle crashes killed 136 pedestrians and 20 bicyclists, while bike crashes killed three pedestrians and one bicyclist. And while total pedestrian fatalities have fortunately declined in recent years, cyclist deaths are on the rise this year. There have been 15 cyclist fatalities to date this year, already one more than the total for all of last year.
 
One ubiquitous concern among pedestrians is the dangerous ways in which some commercial/delivery cyclists operate their bikes, often disobeying traffic laws and riding on the sidewalks in order to make deliveries as quickly as possible. I sponsor legislation in the Senate (S.4640) which would combat this dangerous problem by establishing liability on the part of the business owner who employs the delivery cyclist: if the cyclist gets a ticket, so does the business owner. This removes the incentive to pressure employees to make deliveries faster, instead encouraging them to avoid tickets by riding more safely. New York City has passed legislation mandating that commercial bicyclists wear retro-reflective upper-body apparel with their three-digit ID number and the business name on the back. 
 
Laws passed are only as effective as the level of law enforcement employed to implement them. Over the years I have put pressure on the NYPD to ramp up enforcement of the traffic laws for cyclists, and will continue to do so. More police officers on bikes, stationed at problematic intersections, are the best tools we have to make sure that cyclists follow the law, and that violators are issued summonses.
 
Many constituents who contact me about these issues are surprised to learn that bicycles are obligated to follow the same traffic laws as motor vehicles -- stopping at red lights, riding in the street or bike lane, yielding to pedestrians while making turns, and wearing the appropriate safety gear.  And to answer the endless questions: electric bicycles are not legal to ride on streets or sidewalks. If you want to ride a motorcycle, get a driver’s license and register it with the DMV -- and stay out of the bike lanes!
 
I also believe that as CitiBike expands, it is important to make sure new cyclists and tourists who may not be familiar with our traffic laws are informed of their responsibilities as cyclists. I have recently written to the Department of Transportation, which oversees the CitiBike program, urging them to add better signage at CitiBike docking stations outlining the rules and responsibilities of each rider.
 
While I understand the concerns of many regarding the increased number of bicycles on the road, I also believe that environmentally-friendly modes of transportation like cycling are overall a net-positive for a city that is gridlocked by motor vehicle traffic and a mass transit system bursting at the seams. Fewer cars on the road also means safer streets for pedestrians in our walking city. The fact is, growing numbers of New Yorkers are using a bicycle as their primary way of commuting, and those numbers will continue to grow. CitiBike membership has soared to upwards of 160,000 annual subscribers in 2016, and the City’s implementation of a network of bicycle lanes have made cycling more efficient, safe, and appealing. We need to make sure that riders are aware of the laws and that those laws are enforced, but we also need to ensure that the needs of the growing number of bicyclists are met, so that they can safely use NYC streets.
 
I often describe Manhattan as the “head of pin that everyone wants to balance on…and many keep falling off.” Because of the density of pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers alike we must all be aware of the traffic laws and follow them! Below I have included links to helpful information and resources. You will find a complete list of New York City bike rules courtesy of the NYC Department of Transportation, as well as the agency’s amusing and informative “Don’t Be A Jerk” campaign, which offers short video clips outlining the ‘do and don’ts’ of cycling. I’ve also included safety tips for bicyclists and pedestrians provided by Transportation Alternatives--an advocacy group focused on pedestrians, bikes, and mass transit.
 
Complete List of NYC Bicycle Rules: 
 
“Don’t Be a Jerk” Campaign:
 
 
PS: One more thing I’d like to share – On August 26th, which was Women’s Equality Day, the Albany Times Union interviewed me about my experiences as a woman legislator. If you are interested, you can read it here:
 
 
Policy Spotlight

Last month I joined with nineteen other Senators in writing to Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos, calling for the closure of the "fracking waste loophole." Although hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, was banned in New York State in 2015, solid and liquid waste from out-of-state fracking facilities is still being deposited in New York landfills. The letter urges Commissioner Seggos to use a rulemaking process currently underway to ban the disposal of all fracking waste in the state. 
 
When we banned fracking, New York State became a national leader in protecting the health and well-being of our people. But although we shut the front door on fracking, we left the side door wide open. Hundreds of thousands of tons of fracking waste have poured into our state, threatening our land and water, and putting New Yorkers at risk. This loophole must be closed, and it cannot happen soon enough.
 
New York State enacted a moratorium on fracking in 2008, and Governor Andrew Cuomo banned the practice in 2015, in part due to concerns about the health risks posed by waste materials. Yet according to a report by Environmental Advocates of New York, at least 570,500 tons of solid fracking waste and 23,000 barrels of liquid waste were dumped in New York landfills between 2010 and 2015. Fracking waste is also used in some locations for de-icing purposes on roads.
 
Fracking waste poses several health risks, particularly when it leaches from landfills and enters the water and food supply. Fracking waste contains highly toxic and carcinogenic chemicals such as benzene, formaldehyde, and etholene glycol. It is also radioactive, containing Radium-226 and 228, which are highly water soluble, not treatable by New York’s wastewater treatment plants, and linked to serious diseases such as lymphoma, bone cancer, and leukemia.
 
The DEC is currently in the process of revising regulations covering solid waste management facilities, including those that accept fracking waste. More information on the proposed regulations are available at http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/81768.html
 
The Department is accepting public comments on proposed regulations until 5pm on September 13th. Comments can be submitted to: SolidWasteRegulations@dec.ny.gov or Melissa Treers, P.E., New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Materials Management, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-7260.
 
My letter signed by several Senate colleagues can be viewed here: https://www.scribd.com/document/321998329/Comments-on-DEC-Part-360-Revision
 

Community Spotlight

Senator Liz Krueger’s Tenth Annual Senior Resource Fair on October 27th:
My tenth annual Senior Resource Fair will take place Thursday, October 27th from 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. at Temple Emanu-El, One East 65th Street (at Fifth Avenue).  Over 500 people attended last year’s event.  This year we will have over 50 exhibitors from non-profits and city and state agencies with information for Older Adults. Admission is free.  Light refreshments will be served. NO RSVP NECESSARY. For further information, call (212) 490-9535.
 
Primary Election Tuesday September 13:
State and local primary elections will take place on Tuesday September 13. There are judicial and local party office primaries for some but not all of my district. You will need to already be enrolled in a political party to be eligible to vote in that party's primary contests. 
 
You can find your poll site and see your sample ballot at https://nyc.pollsitelocator.com/search.  Check if you're registered to vote and your party enrollment here: https://voterlookup.elections.state.ny.us/.

Student Registration Centers Open through September 16th:
The NYC Department of Education Office of Student Enrollment has nine temporary Student Registration Centers to assist families who are new to New York City public schools. All new high school students must enroll at a Registration Center.
 
Please note, however, that new elementary and middle school students with a zoned school should register at their zoned school beginning Thursday, September 8, the first day of school. These students do not need to visit a Registration Center in order to enroll. Families can determine their zoned school by inputting their address into the school search function at http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm.  
 
For High School Students, registration Centers will be open 8:00 am - 3:00 pm, Monday - Friday, from August 31 – September 16. Registration Centers will be closed on September 5 for Labor Day and September 12 for Eid al-Adha.  The Manhattan Registration Center is located at The High School of Fashion Industries, 225 West 24th Street (enter on West 25thStreet between 7th and 8th Avenues).  For details about other Registration Center locations and a list of documents required for registration, visit http://schools.nyc.gov/ChoicesEnrollment/NewStudents/default.htm.

Upcoming Pet Adoption Events:
Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) is sponsoring several Pet Adoption events around the district in December. Upcoming dates and locations are:

Saturday, September 17, 11-3PM: 
Biscuits & Bath Sutton Place, 1064 1st Avenue at East 58th Street – Dogs only 
 
Saturday, September 17, 12-4 PM
NY Vet Hospital, 150 East 74th Street
 
Upcoming events are also listed at http://nycacc.org/Events.htm
 
The Radical Age Movement Forum on Technology and Ageism:
On Tuesday, Sep. 20, The Radical Age Movement is holding a presentation entitled “How Technology Promotes Ageism and What You Can Do to Fight Back.” The speaker will be Thomas Kamber, Executive Director of Older Adults Technology Services, Senior Planet. Learn More about "Techno-Ageism"
and how the digital world is failing seniors.  The event will take place from 6:30 p.m.– 8:00 p.m. at the NY Ethical Culture Society, 2 West 64th Street at Central Park West.  Beverages and light fare will be served. Suggested donation $10. RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-technology-promotes-ageism-and-what-you-can-do-to-fight-b ack-tickets-27468738737.

Shred-a-Thon on September 24th:
On Saturday, September 24th, Assemblymember Rebecca Seawright is hosting a shred-a-thon in partnership with Upper Green Side.  The event will take place on 82nd Street between York and First Avenue 10:00AM – 2:00PM.
 
Department of Sanitation SAFE Disposal Event:
To help residents dispose of harmful household products safely, DSNY hosts SAFE (Solvents, Automotive, Flammables, and Electronics) Disposal Events throughout the year in all five boroughs. Events are held, rain or shine, from 10 am to 4 pm. Because they are popular, be prepared for a line. Only NYC residential waste is accepted at SAFE Disposal Events, and no commercial vehicles are allowed. Residents must provide proof of NYC residency, such as a NYS driver’s license or utility bill. Materials collected are either recycled, blended for fuel, or sent to licensed hazardous waste treatment facilities for safe disposal.
 
The next Manhattan event will be: 
Sunday, September 25
Union Square North Plaza
South of 17th St between Park Ave & Broadway
Cars enter at Park Ave & 18th St
 
Your Rights to Accessible Housing:
My office receives frequent calls from constituents with disabilities seeking help in getting their landlords to make their buildings and/or apartments accessible.  The good news is that the New York City Human Rights Commission aggressively enforces city laws that require landlords to make reasonable accommodation for people with disabilities.  If you are having trouble getting your landlord to make accommodations such as installation of shower grab-bars or ramps, contact the Human Rights Commission at (718) 722-3131 or visit http://www1.nyc.gov/site/cchr/about/report-discrimination.page.
 
There was a recent article highlighting the work of Ted Finkelstein at the Human Rights Commission in getting buildings to fulfill their obligations under the law which you can see here:

Scam Alert – Fake Calls from State Tax Department:
The New York State Department of Taxation and Finance reports that scammers are cloning the Tax Department’s fraud hotline phone numbers so they appear on a taxpayer’s caller ID, giving the impression that these bogus calls are legitimate ones from the agency.
 
If either of the following Tax Department numbers appears on a caller ID system, it’s an immediate signal that the caller is a scam artist: 518-457-5181 or 518-457-0578. These phone numbers are for taxpayers making incoming calls to the Tax Department. The Tax Department doesn’t use these numbers for outgoing calls.
 
Many of the imposters who call demand payments on iTunes gift cards and other reloadable debit cards, which are obvious red flags.
 
If you’re unsure a caller claiming to be from the Tax Department is legitimate, contact the Tax Department call center at (518) 457-5434. A live representative will be able to verify any tax issues that you may have.
 
If you believe that you’ve been contacted by someone attempting a scam, or you or a client have been the victim of fraud or identity theft, visit the Tax Department’s fraud, scams, and identity theft webpage at https://tax.ny.gov/help/contact/fraud-scams-idtheft.htm to learn how to report it. The Tax Department takes this type of illegal activity seriously, promptly reviews each complaint, and takes corrective action when appropriate.

Financial Empowerment Workshops at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House:
Every Tuesday from October 4th through November 1st, Lenox Hill Neighborhood House is offering “Getting Ahead” a free in-depth Financial Literacy Course, which will meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th Street.  The course will provide an opportunity to see your credit report, meet one-on-one with a financial advisor, open a free savings account, and set and reach financial goals.  Registration is required.  To enroll, contact Lauren Bernstein at 212-218-0413 or lbernstein@lenoxhill.org no later than September 23rd.
 
Legal Advocacy Clinics At Lenox Hill Neighborhood House:
The Lenox Hill Neighborhood House Legal Advocacy Center Offers assistance on a number of different issues. Here is a list of their ongoing programs and clinics:
● SNAP (formerly Food Stamps) Clinics: Wednesdays from 10am to 1pm at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th Street. First come, first served. Bring proof of identity, income information, utility bill, proof of housing costs, information on any dependents and if you are 60 or over or on SSI/SSD, information on medical costs.  For more information, call 
212-218-0431.
● SCRIE Clinics: call 
212-218-0503 ext. 6 for assistance in applying or recertifying for the Senior Citizens Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) program. The SCRIE clinic is open to tenants city-wide. Please note that due to the volume of calls, it sometimes takes up to two weeks for staff to respond to messages.
● Eviction Prevention: Walk-in clinic, every 2nd and 4th  Monday of the month, from 
10am to 1pm at 331 East 70th Street, for tenants who live, work, or go to school on Manhattan’s East Side above 59th Street and on Roosevelt Island.
● End-of-Life Planning/Advance Directives: volunteer attorneys may be able to assist you with one-on-one counseling and individualized drafting of Advance Directives including Health Care Proxies, Living Wills, Powers of Attorney, and simple, low-asset Wills. If you are interested in being screened for a possible appointment,  call the intake hotline at 
212-218-0503 ext 4.
● Health Care Access/Medicare/Medicaid: call 
212-218-0503 ext 3. Find out about Medicare Savings Programs, Medicaid home care, Medicare Part D, Medicaid Spend-down, EPIC and if you are eligible for Medicaid.
● Health Insurance Enrollment: call 
212-218-0432.  Assistance with finding and enrolling in an affordable health insurance plan. 
 
VOLS Legal Clinics for Low-Income Residents Over Age 60: 
The Volunteers of Legal Services (VOLS) Elderly Project provides pro-bono legal services to low-income people over age 60 who live in Manhattan. VOLS conducts legal clinics each month at senior centers where seniors can discuss their legal concerns in confidence, receive legal advice and, where appropriate, obtain referrals to a volunteer lawyer for representation. Areas of legal assistance include wills, medical directives, powers of attorney, housing, consumer matters and Medicaid. Over 150 lawyers serve on their Elderly Project volunteer attorney roster. 
 
Upcoming Clinic dates and locations are below:
 
Burden Center for the Aging, 1484 First Avenue (between 77th & 78th Streets) — 2 pm — second Friday of each month (September 9, October 14). Call Velda Murad at 212-879-7400 for information. 
 
Stanley Isaacs Senior Center, 415 East 93rd Street (east of 1st Avenue) — 10 am — third Friday of each month (September 16, October 14). Call Khristel Simmons at 212-360-7620 ext, 158 for information. 
 
Encore Community Services Senior Center, St. Malachy’s Church - 239 West 49th Street (between Broadway and 8th Avenue) — 10 am — fourth Monday of Each Month (September 26, October 24). Call Narobe Arias at 212-581-2910, ext 125 for information.

Affordable Housing Opportunities in Manhattan:
Strivers Plaza
 is now accepting applications for 53 affordable studio and 1-, and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 275 West 140th Street in the Central Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $494 and $2,4055, depending on unit size and income. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $18,275 and $158,550, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 2 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
 
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to Strivers Plaza, 87-14 116th Street, Richmond Hill, NY 11418.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by September 23, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
225 East 39th Street Apartments is now accepting applications for 75 affordable studio and 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 225 East 39th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $833 and $1,247, depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $29,898 and $63,060, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 6 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
 
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to East 39th Street Apartments, 1357 Broadway, Box 309, New York, NY 10018.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by September 27, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
West 38th Street Apartments is now accepting applications for 46 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 509-515 West 38th Street in the Hudson Yards neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $913 and $1,183, depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $32,640 and $54,360, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 4 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
                                                            
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to West 38th Â Street Apartments, 1357 Broadway, Box 309, New York, NY 10018.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 4, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
525 W. 52nd Street Apartments is now accepting applications for 79 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 509-515 West 38th Street in the Clinton neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $913 and $1,183, depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $32,640 and $54,360, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 4 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
                                                            
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to 525 W. 52nd Â Street Apts, 243 5th Avenue, Box 428, New York, NY 10016.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 8, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
American Copper Buildings is now accepting applications for 160 affordable studio and 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 225 East 39th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $833 and $1,247, depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $29,898 and $63,060, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 6 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
 
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to American Copper Buildings c/o Breaking Ground, PO Box 3620937, New York, NY 10129.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 14, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
Maestro West Chelsea Apartments is now accepting applications for 75 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 507 West 28th Street in the Chelsea neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $596 and $979, depending on income and unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $21,772 and $45,300, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 4 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
                                                            
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to Maestro West Chelsea, 87-14 116th Street, Richmond Hill, NY  11418.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by October 18, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
10 Freedom Place is now accepting applications for 110 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 10 Freedom Place south on the Upper West Side in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments are $833 and $1,458, depending on income and unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $29,898 and $72,480, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 7 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
                                                            
Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to 10 Freedom Place 
c/o Breaking Ground, PO Box 3620937, New York, NY 10129.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by November 1, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.

Metrocard Bus and Van Schedule:
The MTA offers MetroCard-related services throughout New York City through mobile buses and vans. Buses provide a full range of services, including applying for or refilling a Reduced-Fare MetroCard, buying or refilling a regular MetroCard, or getting answers to a MetroCard-related question. Vans sell Unlimited Ride MetroCards and Pay-Per-Ride MetroCards, and they refill MetroCards and Reduced-Fare MetroCards. Buses and vans will be in my district on the following dates and locations:

September 13, 9 - 10:30 am, 92 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
September 13, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm., 86 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
September 13, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
September 15, 8:30 - 10:30 am, 47 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
September 15, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, 28 Street & 2 Avenue – Van 
September 21, 9 - 10:30 am, 79 Street & 3 Avenue – Bus
September 21, 11 am - 1 pm, 7
9 Street & York Avenue – Bus
September 21, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 72 Street & York Avenue – Bus
September 27, 9 - 10:30 am, 92 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
September 27, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm., 86 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
September 27, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
October 5, 9 - 10:30 am, 7
9 Street & 3 Avenue – Bus
October 5, 11 am - 1 pm, 7
9 Street & York Avenue – Bus
October 5, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 72 Street & York Avenue – Bus 
October 6, 7 – 9 am, 90 Street and York Avenue - Van
October 6, 8:30 - 10:30 am, 47 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
October 6, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, 28 Street & 2 Avenue – Van 
October 7, 9 - 10 am, 57 Street and 1 Avenue – Van
October 7, 10:30 - 11:30 am, 57 Street and 3 Avenue – Van
October 7, 12:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street and 1 Avenue – Van

The full mobile MetroCard schedule is available at http://mta.info/metrocard/mms.htm. Please note that MetroCard buses and vans do not take credit cards.