Translation from English

Monday, April 11, 2016

State Senator Liz Krueger


 
Inline image 1

State Senator Liz Krueger
Standing Up And Speaking Out
New York State Senate – 28th District
Community Bulletin – April 2016

Table of Contents
Message from Liz
Policy Spotlight
        Â Â Â  Modernizing Sales Tax Collection 
Community Update
       Â Â Â Â Â  Senator Krueger's Roundtable for Boomers & Seniors 
        Â Â Â Â  Small Business Administration Entrepreneurial Seminars
        Â Â Â Â  Summer Jobs with NYC Parks
        Â Â Â Â  Upcoming Pet Adoption Events
       Â Â Â Â Â  Free Tax Preparation Assistance
Blindline Information on Resources for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Financial Assistance to Women Owned Businesses
Financial Literacy Course at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House        
Legal Advocacy Clinics From Lenox Hill Neighborhood House         
Monthly Housing Clinics and Workshops
Affordable Housing Opportunities in Manhattan         
Metrocard Bus and Van Schedule        
Heat Season Rules

Message from Liz...
First an Election Day Reminder: The Democratic and Republican Presidential Primaries are being held Tuesday April 19th.  You must be enrolled in these parties to vote in a primary in New York.  If you are unsure of where to vote, you can find your poll by visiting http://nyc.pollsitelocator.com/search.
 
Now on to a report on the adoption of the State Budget: At about 9:30 a.m. on April 1st after a grueling all-night session, the New York State legislature passed a $157 billion budget for fiscal year 2016-2017.  There were some good things in this budget – paid family leave, a substantial minimum wage increase, more aid for public schools, and the egregious cuts to New York City that were originally proposed by the Governor were not included in the final budget.  So the Governor seems to think it’s time to declare victory after a long night of work.
 
But even with these successes there is plenty to be critical of, and the elephant in the room is the lack of ANY ethics or campaign finance reform.  The Governor introduced bills with his budget to limit outside income for legislators, close the llc loophole, provide public financing for campaigns, provide for pension forfeiture for officials convicted of crimes related to their duties, and several other reform measures.  None of these were included in the final budget.  If we can’t pass meaningful reforms now in the wake of the conviction of both legislative leaders, it is hard to see when we ever will – as Democratic leader Andrea Steward Cousins put it, “we are blowing our Watergate moment.”
 
Furthermore, regardless of whether one thinks the final product is good, bad, or somewhere in between, we should all be able to agree that the budget process has gone completely off the rails. This is not what democracy should look like, and without significant changes we will continue to undermine the integrity of our already shaky governing institutions, and threaten the fiscal stability of our state. We have to do better.
 
The state budget is without a doubt the single most important package of legislation passed in Albany in any given year. Yet every year the process gets even less transparent, and legislators, the press, and the people of New York have less time to examine the bills before we bring them up for a vote. This year was particularly egregious - we pulled an all-nighter like so many procrastinating undergraduates, with the final bills not introduced until nearly 6am, and the governor issuing so called emergency “messages of necessity” even after it was clear that the budget would be late no matter what.  What would be the emergency if it took a few more days and people actually reviewed the bills?
 
As I have said before, in a budget process driven by closed-door negotiations among legislative leaders, it is up to rank-and-file legislators to take a “trust but verify” approach. Yet with only a few hours at most to comb through thousands of pages of budget language, it is simply impossible to verify, and it’s getting more and more difficult every year to trust. By acquiescing to this status quo we as legislators are abdicating our responsibility to look after the interests of the people who elected us.
 
As the floor debates made clear, even the majority Republicans in the Senate had very little idea what was in some of these last-minute bills.  My colleague, the Chair of the Senate Finance Committee, was put in the un-enviable position of answering my questions by explaining she had “faith” that the legislation we were about to pass – which was not yet available to review online or in print -- actually contained what was promised (and nothing more).  This is no way to run an amateur bowling team, let alone one of the largest state budgets in the country.
 
The solutions to avoid this annual farce are simple, easily achieved, and well known. Messages of necessity should be saved for actual emergencies, not used to maintain a debatable reputation for on-time budgets; bills should be made available at least three days in advance of debate, so that they can be carefully parsed to root out shady deals, giveaways, unexplained “lump sums” and poorly thought out policy; and finally, it’s time to end the embarrassingly regressive “three men in a room” system, and open up budget negotiations to the leaders of minority conferences in both houses.
 
The people of New York deserve better than what they’re getting, and it’s up to their elected representatives to give it to them. If New York is going to continue to be a leader in the 21st Century, we have to jettison a budget process that would have been familiar in the 19th Century.


Policy Spotlight

Modernizing Sales Tax Collection

On April 6 I held a forum on modernizing sales tax collection in New York State. The state's current system of sales tax collection has not kept up with changes in retail payment methods and technological innovation. The forum evaluated proposals for modernizing the collection of sales tax to improve its efficiency for retailers and reduce the potential for fraud through sales tax suppression.
 
The purpose of the forum was to identify effective ways to reduce fraud, increase sales tax revenue, provide a more even playing field for businesses, and simplify the process of tax collection and remittance for everyone. Good government requires the efficient collection of taxes, and a good business environment requires everyone to play by the rules. If a business is not paying their share, not only do they have an unfair advantage over their competitors, but everyone else has to pick up the tab for the lost revenue. At a time when we're scraping the bottom of the barrel to fund vital services, fixing our outdated sales tax collection will bring in additional revenue without the need to increase taxes.
 
Sales tax evasion is a significant problem throughout the U.S., costing states billions of dollars each year. In New York State, one tax researcher has estimated that sales tax suppression leads to a loss of $1.7 billion in revenue annually. Electronic sales suppression techniques, including software known as "phantomware" and "zappers," can be used by retailers in their point of sales (POS) systems to modify records and under-report sales. As a result, states and localities are unable to collect the appropriate amount of sales taxes from those businesses. A number of other states and counties have adopted or are exploring the adoption of new technologies to address these issues.
 
Professor Richard Ainsworth of Boston University, an expert on international sales tax collection and fraud prevention, offered an overview of the extent of the problem. According to Ainsworth, New York State loses around $1.7 billion each year due to sales tax suppression. "Zapper" software, which allows users to falsify sales receipts, previously came in the form of CDs or USB thumb drives, but increasingly sophisticated software is now available to download online, making it nearly impossible to track down producers. 
 
Ted Potrikus, President of the Retail Council of New York State, agreed that there is a definite need to reduce sales tax suppression, stating that the issue is not arguable. He pointed out that sales tax avoidance creates challenges and unfair competition for those legitimate businesses that are following the law, though he expressed wariness that proposed solutions should not impose an undue burden on business owners.
 
Bernard Gilles, Directeur Principal of Revenu Québec, and Marie Ivaarson, Vice President of Retail Innovation HTT AB of Sweden, provided an international perspective. Mr. Gilles discussed a program of mandatory billing that Québec's government has begun phasing in for the restaurant industry. Revenu Québec estimates that sales tax evasion leads to $3.5 billion in lost tax revenue. To address these losses, Québec introduced secure sales recording module (SRM) technology to 20,000 restaurants throughout the province, as well as providing a subsidy to restaurant owners for implementation. Revenu Quebec estimates that by 2019, the program will have recovered more than $2 billion in taxes that would otherwise have been lost. The SRM technology was designed to be applied to other industries as well, and Québec is slowly expanding the program. 
 
Assistant District Attorney Jill Mariani spoke on behalf of Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance. She pointed out that 25 other states have laws addressing sales tax suppression software, and offered several proposals for tackling sales tax avoidance. These included imposing felony charges and fines on individuals that manufacture, sell, buy, or use tax suppression software, creating a crime of conspiracy for those who work with businesses to defraud the government of taxes, and making those who perpetrate tax fraud liable for the expenses involved in investigating and prosecuting them. Ms. Mariani also recommended a mandate that all merchants use a standard piece of equipment for recording sales. 
 
Speakers at the forum are listed below:
 
-Jill Mariani, ADA, Office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance
-Warren Klomp, District Administrator, California Board of Equalization
-Bernard Gilles, Directeur Principal, Revenu Québec
-Ted Potrikus, President and CEO, Retail Council of New York State
-Professor Richard Ainsworth, Director, Graduate Tax Program, Boston University
-Marie Ivaarson, Vice President, Retail Innovation HTT AB – SWEDEN
-William Gordon and Pino Luongo, Stac Media
 


Community Spotlight

Senator Krueger's Roundtable for Boomers & Seniors:

This 5-part program provides an opportunity for neighbors to come together to explore life issues that are relevant across the age span. At each session you will hear from and engage with professionals who are knowledgeable on topics that are of concern to the growing population of older adults in New York City.

This year we have been looking at "Financial & Economic Issues" from various viewpoints. Sessions will be held on: Retirement Planning in the Modern Economy, Workplace Realities, Government's Impact on Finances, Defending Assets, and New Solutions for Workers & Families.

The program meets one Thursday morning per month in November, December, March, April, and May. Sessions are from 
8:30am to 10:30am at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th St.

Session 5 – Thursday, May 6th: Your Money, Your Voice: Advocating on Financial Issues. Please RSVP by contacting my office at 
212-490-9535, or via email at liz@lizkrueger.com.

Small Business Administration Entrepreneurial Seminars:
The Small Business Administration (SBA) offers free seminars for startups and early growth entrepreneurs. The following events will take place in April and May:
 
APRIL 19, 2016, 9:30 am – 11:15 am: ESTABLISHING AND REPAIRING YOUR PERSONAL CREDIT
Can’t get a loan due to poor credit! Learn the fundamentals for establishment and maintenance of good personal credit. 
 
MAY 15, 2016, 9:30 am—11:30 am: SBA LOAN PROGRAMS AND BENEFITS 
New Entrepreneurs often make errors when applying for loans. Find out about SBA’s loan programs and how they benefit your business.
 
The seminars take place at 290 Broadway, (bet. Duane & Reade) 30th Floor, Rm. 2. Bring I.D. for entry. RSVP required to SYLVIA.RIVERA@sba.gov or 212-264-9487.
 
In addition the SBA will also be hosting a Seminar on “Alternative Lending for Small Business Entrepreneurs” on Thursday April 21st from 9:00 a.m. to Noon at 26 Federal Plaza, 6th Floor Conference Room.  For more information or to RSVP contact Robin Daniels at robin.daniels@sba.gov or 212-264-1763.

Summer Jobs with NYC Parks:
NYC Parks is currently looking for enthusiastic job seekers who have a passion for helping New Yorkers get fit, learn about the natural world, play sports, and have fun through our free public programming citywide. They are looking to fill positions including:
 
Swim Instructors
Summer Camp Counselors
Seasonal Urban Park Rangers
“Kids in Motion” Playground Associates
Mobile Recreation Unit Playground Associates and Supervisors
"Summer Sports Experience" Playground Associates
Piping Plover Monitors
Adventure Course Facilitators 
 
The length of employment for these positions ranges from two - eight months with pay rates up to $19.51/hour. Those that are interested can go to the Parks Department website at http://www.nycgovparks.org/opportunities/jobs/seasonal to view all the seasonal job opportunities, which also include maintenance and other skilled trade positions. 

Upcoming Pet Adoption Events:
Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) is sponsoring several Pet Adoption events around the district in December. Upcoming dates and locations are:

Saturday, April 16, 11am-3pm:
Dog Adoptions at Biscuits & Bath, Sutton Place, 1064 First Ave.

Upcoming events are also listed at 
http://nycacc.org/Events.htm.

Free Tax Preparation Assistance: 
IRS-trained volunteers are available to provide free tax preparation assistance throughout New York City through April 15. I encourage you to take advantage of these services, which can save you money and ensure you avoid getting caught in “Refund Anticipation Loan” scams that many for-profit tax preparers engage in. AARP is sponsoring a number of locations on the East Side, and there are no age or income restrictions to receive this assistance. Here are some sites in the 28th Senate District where you can get free assistance with your taxes:

58th Street Library, 127 East 58th Street
Telephone: 
212-759-7358
Site Hours: Wednesday 
11:00am to 3:00pm and Saturday, 10:00am-2:00pm
Â
67th Street Library, 328 East 67th Street
Telephone: 
212-734-1717
Site Hours: Friday, 
10:00am-2:00pm

Community Church of New York, 40 East 35th Street
Telephone: 
212-683-4988
Site Hours: Thursday, 
10:00am-2:00pm

Epiphany Library, 228 East 23rd Street
Telephone: 
212-679-2645
Site Hours: Thursday, 
10:00am-2:00pm

Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th Street
Telephone: 
212-744-5022
Site Hours: Wednesday, 
10:00am-2:00pm

Science, Industry and Business Library (SIBL), 188 Madison Ave @ 34th Street
Telephone: 
917-275-6975
Site Hours: Tuesday and Wednesday, 
10:00am-2:00pm.
Â
Stanley Isaacs Neighborhood Center, 415 East 93rd Street
Telephone: 
212-360-7620
Site Hours: Friday, 
9:30am-2:00pm
Â
Webster Branch Library, 1465 York Avenue
Telephone: 
212-288-5049
Site Hours: Monday, 
11:00am-3:00pm except 2/15

A full list of free tax preparation sites is available at 
http://www1.nyc.gov/site/dca/consumers/file-your-taxes.page.

Blindline Information on Resources for the Blind and Visually Impaired:
Blindline® is a comprehensive information and referral service for people who are blind or visually impaired, their family members, caregivers, and professional service providers. The service includes a toll-free telephone number as well as a fully-accessible website, both of which are linked to a New York State database of accessible products and services, such as museums with audio and tactile exhibits, restaurants with Braille menus, local government and social service offices, accessible libraries, recreational facilities and retail establishments that carry products that are accessible for users with little or no vision.  In addition, Blindline® is a vocational training program, designed to enhance the performance skills of the volunteers, who themselves are blind or visually impaired.
 
Blindline® is housed at the main offices of VISIONS/Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and receives support from the New York City council.  You can contact Blindline® by telephone at 1 (888) 625-1616 or www.blindline.org.

Financial Assistance to Women Owned Businesses:
The Women’s Enterprise Action Loan Fund, WEALF, provides an interest free loan of up to $5,000 and one-on-one mentoring to women’s owned businesses in the metro area. For more information visit https://www.facebook.com/WEALFUND/. For an application for the WEALF loan please email wealthfund@gmail.com 

Financial Literacy Course at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House:
Lenox Hill Neighborhood House is offering “Getting Ahead,”” a free Financial Literacy Course that will meet every Wednesday from May 11th through June 8th from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at 331 East 70th Street. Meet with a financial advisor and learn ways to increase your financial stability, get a free credit report, open a free savings account, and reach your financial goals.  Registration is required. Space is limited. To enroll, please contact Eve Mersfelder no later than May 4th at 212-218-0475 or 
emersfelder@lenoxhill.org.

Legal Advocacy Clinics At Lenox Hill Neighborhood House:
The Lenox Hill Neighborhood House Legal Advocacy Center Offers assistance on a number of different issues. Here is a list of their ongoing programs and clinics:
● SNAP (formerly Food Stamps) Clinics: Wednesdays from 10am to 1pm at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 331 East 70th Street. First come, first served. Bring proof of identity, income information, utility bill, proof of housing costs, information on any dependents and if you are 60 or over or on SSI/SSD, information on medical costs.  For more information, call 
212-218-0431.
● SCRIE Clinics: call 
212-218-0503 ext. 6 for assistance in applying or recertifying for the Senior Citizens Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) program. The SCRIE clinic is open to tenants city-wide. Please note that due to the volume of calls, it sometimes takes up to two weeks for staff to respond to messages.
● Eviction Prevention: Walk-in clinic, every 2nd and 4th  Monday of the month, from 
10am to 1pm at 331 East 70th Street, for tenants who live, work, or go to school on Manhattan’s East Side above 59th Street and on Roosevelt Island.
● End-of-Life Planning/Advance Directives: volunteer attorneys may be able to assist you with one-on-one counseling and individualized drafting of Advance Directives including Health Care Proxies, Living Wills, Powers of Attorney, and simple, low-asset Wills. If you are interested in being screened for a possible appointment,  call the intake hotline at 
212-218-0503 ext 4.
● Health Care Access/Medicare/Medicaid: call 
212-218-0503 ext 3. Find out about Medicare Savings Programs, Medicaid home care, Medicare Part D, Medicaid Spend-down, EPIC and if you are eligible for Medicaid.
● Health Insurance Enrollment: call 
212-218-0432.  Assistance with finding and enrolling in an affordable health insurance plan.

And, just across the Park on the Westside: Monthly Housing Clinics and Workshops:
Council Member Helen Rosenthal, Goddard Riverside’s SRO Law Project, and the Urban Justice Center co-sponsor monthly housing clinics and workshops at the Goddard Riverside Community Center, 593 Columbus Avenue (between 88th and 89th Streets). On the first Wednesday of each month, from 
6pm – 8pm, the clinic offers a presentation on a variety of topics, followed by a question and answer session. Each evening, at least one staff attorney will meet with individuals who are seeking specific legal advice.

For questions, contact the Office of Council Member Rosenthal at 
(212) 873-0282 ext. 206 or Helen@helenrosenthal.com. Sign-up sheet starting at 6pm each evening.
May 4, 2016: SCRIE and DRIEJune 1, 2016: Succession Rights

Affordable Housing Opportunities in Manhattan:

West 153 Owner LLC is now accepting applications for 34 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 260 West 153rd Street in the Central Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments range from $641 to $836 depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $23,349 and $43,150, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 10 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
https://a806-housingconnect.nyc.gov/nyclottery/AdvertisementPdf/226.pdf.

Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at 
www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to: West 153 Owner LLC, Hellgate Station, PO Box 125, New York, NY 10029.

Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by 
April 12, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
Enclave at the Cathedral is now accepting applications for 87 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 400 West 113th Street in the Morningside Heights neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments range from $887 to $1,123 depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $29,726 and $51,780, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 9 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at https://a806-housingconnect.nyc.gov/nyclottery/AdvertisementPdf/229.pdf.

Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at 
www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an  application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to: ENCLAVE AT THE CATHEDRAL c/o Urban Associates, LLC., P.O. Box 4089, NEW YORK, NY 10023.

Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by 
April 12, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.

TPT Homes in Harlem Phase II is now accepting applications for 16 affordable studio and 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly renovated at 152 West 124th Street and 70 East 127th Street in the Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments range from $1040 to $2165 depending on income and unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $36,995 and $107,875 depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 10 and 11 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at 
https://a806-housingconnect.nyc.gov/nyclottery/AdvertisementPdf/234.pdf.

Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at 
www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an  application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to: TPT Homes in Harlem, 2082 Lexington Avenue, Suite 201, New York, NY 10035.

Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by 
April 19, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
71 E 110 STREET APARTMENTS is now accepting applications for 3 affordable studio and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 71 East 100th Street in the East Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments range from $839 to $1089 depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $28,776 and $52,020 depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 11 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at https://a806-housingconnect.nyc.gov/nyclottery/AdvertisementPdf/236.pdf.

Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at 
www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to: Lovina Realty, LLC c/o SJP Tax Consultants Inc, 149-41 14th Avenue, Whitestone NY 11357.
 
Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by April 25, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.
 
Harlem Dowling Alembic LLC is now accepting applications for 47 affordable 1- and 2-bedroom apartments newly constructed at 2139 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. in the Central Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan. Rents for these apartments range from $847 to $1025 depending on unit size. To be eligible, applicants must have incomes between $30,412 and $51,780, depending on unit and family size. Preference will be given to Community Board 10 residents for 50% of units, mobility-impaired persons for 5% of units, visual- and/or hearing-impaired persons for 2% of units, and City of New York municipal employees for 5% of units. A full description of the building and application process is available at https://a806-housingconnect.nyc.gov/nyclottery/AdvertisementPdf/231.pdf.

Households may elect to submit an application by one of two methods: EITHER online OR by mail. To submit your application online now, please visit NYC Housing Connect at 
www.nyc.gov/housingconnect and select “Apply for Housing.” To request an application by mail, mail a self-addressed envelope to: Lemle & Wolff Inc. 5925 Broadway, Bronx, NY 10463

Completed applications must be submitted online or returned by regular mail only to the post office box that will be listed on the application. Applications must be submitted online or postmarked by 
May 10, 2016. Applicants who submit more than one application may be disqualified.

Metrocard Bus and Van Schedule:
The MTA offers MetroCard-related services throughout New York City through mobile buses and vans. Buses provide a full range of services, including applying for or refilling a Reduced-Fare MetroCard, buying or refilling a regular MetroCard, or getting answers to a MetroCard-related question. Vans sell Unlimited Ride MetroCards and Pay-Per-Ride MetroCards, and they refill MetroCards and Reduced-Fare MetroCards. Buses and vans will be in my district on the following dates and locations:

April 12, 9 - 10:30 am, 92 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
April 12, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm., 86 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
April 12, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
April 20, 9 - 10:30 am, 79 Street & 3 Avenue – Bus
April 20, 11 am - 1 pm, 7
9 Street & York Avenue – Bus
April 20, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 72 Street & York Avenue – Bus
April 21, 8:30 - 10:30 am, 47 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
April 21, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, 28 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
April 26, 9 - 10:30 am, 92 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
April 26, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm., 86 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
April 26, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street & Lexington Avenue – Bus
May 4 4, 
9 - 10:30 am, 79 Street & 3 Avenue – Bus May 4, 11 am - 1 pm, 79 Street & York Avenue – Bus May 4, 1:30 - 2:30 pm, 72 Street & York Avenue – Bus
May 5, 
7 – 9 am, 90 Street and York Avenue - VanMay 5, 8:30 - 10:30 am, 47 Street & 2 Avenue – VanMay 5, 1:30 - 3:30 pm, 28 Street & 2 Avenue – Van
May 6, 
9 - 10 am, 57 Street and 1 Avenue – Van
May 6, 10:30 - 11:30 am, 57 Street and 3 Avenue – Van
May 6, 12:30 - 2:30 pm, 68 Street and 1 Avenue – Van

The full mobile MetroCard schedule is available at 
http://mta.info/metrocard/mms.htm. Please note that MetroCard buses and vans do not take credit cards.

Heat Season Rules: 
The City Housing Maintenance Code and State Multiple Dwelling Law require building owners to provide heat and hot water to all tenants. Building owners are required to provide hot water 365 days a year at a constant minimum temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit.
Â
Between October 1st and May 31st, a period designated as “Heat Season,” building owners are also required to provide tenants with heat under the following conditions:
● Between the hours of 6AM and 10PM, if the outside temperature falls below 55 degrees, the inside temperature is required to be at least 68 degrees Fahrenheit.
● Between the hours of 10PM and 6AM, if the temperature outside falls below 40 degrees, the inside temperature is required to be at least 55 degrees Fahrenheit.
Tenants who are cold in their apartments should first attempt to notify the building owner, managing agent or superintendent. If heat is not restored, the tenant should call the City’s Citizen Service Center at 311. For the hearing-impaired, the TTY number is 
(212) 504-4115. The Center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Complaints can also be submitted online at http://www1.nyc.gov/nyc-resources/service/1813/heat-or-hot-water-complaint.